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Knitted Snood

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Woman wearing her long hair loose, in a knitted, paper bag style, snood.

Shoulder-length tresses look ever so nice tucked into a snood. These are quite simple to make and may be crocheted, netted, knitted, or made from narrow strips of felt. There is no fixed mesh for working these; nobby light-as-a-feather snoods, but it is important that they are made large enough to hang to shoulders in bag-fashion (as shown in illustration). Another up-to-the minute idea is to add a snood to your favourite beanie – the latter is worn well back on the head and a snood about eight inches wide netted or crocheted on.

The original of the Snood illustrated on this page measured fourteen inches square before being gathered up as explained later.

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There are many open stitches suitable for this, the following being a good example :

Materials Required

  • One half ounce, or 15 grams of Woolworth’s extra super 2 ply wool.
  • One Pair Old UK No 3 Knitting needles (US size 10 ½/ 6.5mm) (for version one), or Old UK No 2 Knitting needles (US size 10 ½/ 7mm) (for version two)

Pattern

Version One

Cast on 40 sts (to measure 14 inches or 35.5 cm)

Row 1: K2tog, *yo, k2tog; repeat from * to the last 2sts, yo, k2.

Row 2: Purl.

These two rows are repeated until the work measures 14 inches, or 35.5cm square or deeper if desired. Make up according to the instructions below.

Version Two (Honeycomb Stitch)

Cast on 40sts and knit one row.

Row 1: K1, *Insert needle into the next stitch in the row below and knit into it; k1; repeat from * to the last st, k1.

Row 2: Knit.

Row 3: K2, *Insert needle into the next stitch in the row below and knit into it; k1; repeat from * to the last 2 sts, k2.

Row 4: Knit.

These four rows are repeated until the work measures 14 inches, or 35.5cm square or deeper if desired. Make up according to the instructions below.

To Make Up

Gather the two sides separately and draw up to about 6 inches, or 15cm. Make these gathers form by oversewing invisibly.

Thread three inches of tubular elastic (or crocheted chain to match) into the lower edge – this being the “cast on” edge.

Thread about 6 inches of elastic into top – theis is the cast off edge.

There are many ways of finishing the top, amongst them being a flat bow, a band of fur, a bow of crochet worked to match , and crocheted or knitted flowers.

Click here to download the original pattern in pdf format


This pattern was originally published in Madame Weigel’s Journal of Fashion on September 1st, 1944 and is in the public domain in Australia.

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1 Comment

  1. Heather

    Thank you for the proactive instructions. Lockdown no hair dresser, hair is getting on my nerves, mobility prevents raised arms so I thought, snood. Your pattern means I now have a positive purpose to knit. Maybe different colours to match dress for the day. 😉🤗👍😷
    Thank you for sharing.

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