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Vandyke Cosy in Crochet

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semi circle tea cosy worked in stripes of ripple stitch

A pretty rose in Irish crochet finishes the centre of this easily crocheted Vandyke cosy.

Materials

1 oz. each of three shades of brown, three shades of orange, two shades of fawn, 4-ply wool.

A medium-sized crochet hook.

Pattern

Note: This pattern is written entirely in UK crochet terms. UK double crochet = us single crochet; UK treble = US double crochet and so on.

Make a chain of sixty-four stitches with the lightest shade of fawn, join round;

With the darkest shade of orange wool work:

1st Round: * One dc into each of two stitches, three into the next, repeat from * seventeen times more, one dc into each of ten stitches.

In the next and all following rows work into the back horizontal loop of each stitch.

2nd Round: With the second shade of orange work one dc into each of three stitches, three into the next, * one dc into each of four stitches, three into the next, repeat from * sixteen times more, one dc into each of ten stitches.

3rd Round: With the third shade of orange work one dc into each of four stitches, three into the next, * one dc into each of six stitches, three into the next, repeat from * sixteen times more, one dc into each of ten stitches.

4th Round: With lightest fawn, one dc into each of five stitches, three into the next, * one dc into each of eight stitches, three into the next, repeat from * sixteen times more, one dc into each of ten stitches.

5th Round: With the darkest fawn, one dc into each of six stitches, three into the next, * one dc into each of ten stitches, three into the next, repeat from * sixteen times more, one dc into each of ten stitches.

The work is now continued in rows over the vandykes, but the plain part at the bottom of the cosy in not worked upon.

6th Row: With the lightest fawn, one dc into each of five stitches, three into the point of vandyke, * one dc into each of five stitches, pass over two stitches in the depth between two vandykes, one dc into each of five next stitches, three into point of vandyke, repeat from * to the end of row, finish the row with one dc into each of five stitches.

All the following rows are worked like the sixth row, and the wool is broken off at the end of each row.

7th and 8th Rows: With darkest brown.

9th and 10th Rows: Second shade brown.

11th and 12th Rows: Third shade brown.

13th Row: Darkest shade brown.

14th Row: Second shade brown.

15th Row: Third shade brown.

16th Row: Lightest shade fawn.

17th Row: Darkest shade fawn.

18th and 19th Rows: Darkest shade orange.

20th and 21st Rows: Second shade orange.

22nd and 23rd Rows: Third shade orange.

24th Row: Darkest orange.

25th Row: Second shade orange.

26th Row: Third shade orange.

If a larger cosy is desired continue in this manner.

To fill up the hole at the beginning of the work with darkest brown, work one dc into each alternate stitch of beginning chain.

2nd Round: One treble into a stitch, pass over two stitches, one treble into next stitch, two chain. pass over two stitches and repeat all round.

3rd Round: One treble into two chain, one treble into next two chain, one chain, repeat all round

4th Round: One treble into each chain all round.

The other side is worked like the first.

Irish Crochet Roses (One For Each Side)

Ch 5. Join in ring.

1st Round: (1 dc, 5 T) into ring. Repeat four times more, ending with 1 dc

2nd Round: sl st to centre of base of petal at back, 5 ch, sl st to centre of next petal at base as before. Repeat 4 times more.

3rd Round: (1 dc, 7 T, 1 dc) into 1st loop of ch, working under the ch. Repeat four times more.

4th Round: sl st to centre of base of petal at back, 6 ch, s s to centre of next petal as before. Repeat four times more.

5th Round: (1 dc, 9 T, 1 dc) into 1st loop of ch, working under the ch. Repeat four times more.

To Make Up the Cosy

Put two sides together, right side out, then slipstitch together With one single crochet to every stitch. Sew roses to centre.


The original version of this pattern is in the public domain, however this digital version is copyright Sarah Bradberry, May 17th 2012. All rights reserved.

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